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Latino Labor in the U.S

Objectives at a Glance

Objective One

Recognize that Latino labor is the backbone of the United States, by both fueling the economy and impacting the daily lives of Americans. 

Objective Two

Understand the Latino labor movement’s purpose, length, key figures, and effect to ultimately acknowledge how Latinos themselves earned their rights

Objective Three

Develop the knowledge to support the argument that Latino labor is crucial for a thriving economy

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Objective Four

Explore new narratives pertaining to Latino labor to broaden your awareness on what it truly means to be a Latino labor worker in America

Our Message

Latinos, both born here and immigrants, are the backbone of our country. They have contributed to economic wealth and prosperity in the country. However, they are discriminated against and receive harsh scrutiny on numerous accounts, especially when talking about labor in America. We need to take initiative to become educated on Latinos’ integral role in our society–how they impact our daily lives, boost our economy, and create a more diverse world. With the ultimate goal of understanding their struggle,hard work, and achievements under seemingly impossible odds, we can create a more open minded, just, and inclusive future. 

Objective One

Recognize that Latino labor is the backbone of the United States, by both fueling the economy and allowing Americans to eat cheaply, buy inexpensively constructed homes, buy inexpensive products that have been assembled on both sides of the border, and enjoy beautiful landscaping. The U.S Latino workforce includes doctors, nurses, lawyers, agency directors, educators, and law enforcement officers.

Objective Two

Understand the Latino labor movement’s purpose, length, key figures, and effect to ultimately acknowledge how Latinos themselves fought for and earned their rights to be treated as valuable American workers.

Objective Three

Develop the knowledge to support the argument that since Latino labor is crucial for a thriving economy, and it impacts the daily lives of all Americans, it is our responsibility to dismantle myths regarding their merited place in society and end racist sentiment.

Objective Four

Explore new narratives pertaining to Latino labor to broaden awareness on what it truly means to be a Latino labor worker in America. Through personal stories and testimonies, we will see a new and important side to the legacy Latino laborers leave behind and continue to make in the United States.

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Introduction

With this introduction, we hope to shed a small light on the vast history of Latino labor in the United States and its importance. 

Scholarship

Explaining the ideas of a couple of theorists or thinkers in brief, and point teachers to what chapters, articles might help them learn more. 

Scholarship

Explaining the ideas of a couple of theorists or thinkers in brief, and point teachers to what chapters, articles might help them learn more. 

Teaching

Offering educators the most efficient and impactful ways of teaching the material to their students via modules and student’s styles of learning.

Resources

Providing individualized lesson plans, course material, and primary sources to intentionally and accuretely teach our states youth. 

Introduction

A Brief History on Latinos in the United States
First Arrivals
Spanish-speaking people have lived in North America since the Spaniards colonized Mexico in the sixteenth century, and Mexicans have always played a crucial role in the continent’s culture and history. Mexican culture brought many firsts to North America: The first Thanksgiving took place in either New Mexico or El Paso; the first university in North America was founded in Mexico City; the first printing press on the continent arrived in Mexico in 1538, more than a century before printing came to New England. Mexicans first arrived in present-day New Mexico in 1598 and founded the city of Santa Fe in 1610. By 1800, Spain had governed Mexico as a colony for almost 300 years. Although Spaniards held positions of power, the people of Mexico were primarily mestizos–people of both Spanish and indigenous heritage. They also corralled the indigenous into missionaries throughout the southwest and tried to convert some of them from semi-nomadic hunter-gatherers into settled farmers who would provide cheap labor for the region.
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Scholarship

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Ambivalent Reception

Wayne A. Cornelius discusses the love/hate relationship America has with migrant laborers. It basically says we love cheap food and products but only want “hands” or “brazos (bracero workers) and don’t want foreign bodies with foreign cultures that threaten our cultural hegemony and need services like education and health care

Domestica

This book discusses how domestic labor has become global, and how it particularly impacts women and their roles as mothers and caregivers.

The Impact of Immigrants on Employment Opportunities of Natives

George Borjas synthesizes the theories, models, and econometric methods used to identify the causes and consequences of international labor flows, and lays out with clarity a full spectrum of topics with crucial implications for framing debates over immigration.

Latinas/os in the United States: Changing the Face of América

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Race, Space and Youth Labor Markets

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“We learn more by lookimg for the answer to a question and not finding it than we do from learning the answer itself.”

Lloyd Alexander

Teaching

Inquiry Based Learning

Video Explanation